Latest in China

SinoTech

U.S. and China Delay Bilateral Summit as Negotiators Work on Trade Deal

On March 14, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin shared with reporters that the Trump-Xi summit, originally scheduled for late March, would be pushed back because American and Chinese trade negotiators are still working to address unspecified issues. The Wall Street Journal reported on March 19 that negotiators are hoping to finalize a deal by late April.

China

Document: Huawei Lawsuit Against United States

Huawei has filed suit against the United States, alleging that provisions of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act restricting use of Huawei equipment and services by government agencies and contractors constitute an unconstitutional bill of attainder against the company. The lawsuit comes after high-profile indictments of the company and its Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou in recent weeks.

China

China’s Foreign Investment Law Fails to Address U.S. Concerns

Amid the ongoing U.S.-China trade talks, China has fast-tracked a piece of legislation that serves as its most immediate answer to U.S. concerns regarding Chinese state-directed economic policies and barriers to market access. The draft Foreign Investment Law intends to reform China’s foreign investment regime; its vague provisions, however, will have more far-reaching national security implications for the United States.

Huawei

Keeping Huawei Hardware Out of the U.S. Is Not Enough to Secure 5G

The Trump administration’s effort to protect the security of fifth-generation, or 5G, wireless networks by limiting the deployment of Chinese technology both domestically and globally melds trade policy with cybersecurity policy. On both counts, it should not be considered sufficient.

Syria

The U.S. Withdrawal From Syria Is an Opportunity for China

The announcement that the United States will withdraw its remaining troops from Syria has clear implications for many players with interests at stake in the ongoing civil war. Attention has focused on what the U.S. withdrawal will mean for the Kurds, and whether Turkey will be less restrained, or how Iran and Russia might try to project influence farther east in rebel-held territories retaken from the Islamic State. Noticeably absent from these analyses has been how the withdrawal would affect another great power with vested interests in the Middle East—China.

Subscribe to Lawfare

EmailRSSKindle