Detention: Non-Guantanamo Habeas Litigation

Latest in Detention: Non-Guantanamo Habeas Litigation

detention

The Four Problems With Judge Henderson’s Dissent in Doe v. Mattis

There’s plenty to chew on in the 79 pages of opinions from the D.C. Circuit in Doe v. Mattis—in which a divided panel affirmed a district court injunction blocking the transfer of a U.S. citizen captured in Syria and held in Iraq as an “enemy combatant” to “Country A” (which is likely Iraq) or “Country B” (which is definitely Saudi Arabia).

Detention

Oral Argument Summary: Doe v. Mattis

Earlier today, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit heard oral argument in Doe v. Mattis, the case of a dual U.S.-Saudi citizen (John Doe) detained in Iraq by the U.S. military. Judges Sri Srinivasan and Robert Wilkins considered whether the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia had erred in granting a preliminary injunction requiring the government to give 72 hours of notice before transferring Doe from U.S. custody. Judge Karen LeCraft Henderson was also assigned to the panel but didn’t show up for the oral argument.

Detention

Document: Judge Chutkan Declines to Block Government from Transferring Detainee in Doe v. Mattis

Judge Tanya Chutkan of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia issued a ruling in Doe v. Mattis on January 23, declining to further enjoin the government from transferring Doe out of U.S. custody but requiring the government to provide both the court and the ACLU with 72 hours' notice prior to Doe's transfer.

Detention: Non-Guantanamo Habeas Litigation

ACLU v. Mattis and the Citizen Enemy Combatant in Hamdi v. Rumsfeld

On Dec. 11, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia heard arguments in ACLU v. Mattis on the question whether the ACLU should be permitted to represent a United States citizen who is currently being detained as an enemy combatant in Iraq.

Guantanamo: Legislation

The Meaningful Legal Differences Between Stateside and Guantánamo Detention

Gabor's post from this morning, which is styled as a response to Ben's thoughtful analysis of what it will take to close Guantánamo (while ignoring some of the other responses), concludes that the only meaningful way to "close" Guantánamo is for President Obama "to either release all detainees or try them in our time-tested federal courts," at least largely because moving the detainees into the

NIAC: Conflict with IHRL

Findings, Conclusions and Areas of Dispute Between the SSCI Report, the Minority and the CIA: Part 2

Below, you will find the second installment in our ongoing effort to identify, in summary form, key areas of dispute as between the SSCI, the SSCI minority, and the CIA with regard the CIA's detention and interrogation program.

Detention: Non-Guantanamo Habeas Litigation

The Rahmatullah Saga Goes On

Last week, a British court allowed civil tort claims against the British government to proceed. In Rahmatullah v. Ministry of Defence, the High Court (Queen’s Bench Division) held that a former Pakistani detainee—captured by the United Kingdom but then transferred to American custody—was not barred from suing by either the state immunity or the foreign act of state doctrines.

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