Intelligence Oversight

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Intelligence Oversight

Livestream: Senate Intelligence Hearing on Worldwide Threats

The Senate Intelligence Committee will hold its annual hearing on worldwide threats at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday. The hearing will feature testimony by Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, CIA Director Gina Haspel, FBI Director Christopher Wray, DIA Director Robert Ashley, NSA Director Paul Nakasone and NGIA Director Robert Cardillo.

Intelligence Oversight

A Path Forward for Post-Trump Reforms

The election of a Democratic House of Representatives begins the process of holding President Trump accountable and brings into focus how, in the years to come, Americans should think about repairing the damage he inflicted. To us, Trump’s abuse of our law enforcement and intelligence agencies—where we recently worked—has echoes of the era that culminated in President Nixon’s resignation. But the events of the years after Nixon resigned hold important lessons for the current moment, as well.

Intelligence Oversight

Summary: Big Brother Watch and Others v. the United Kingdom

On Sept. 13, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruled that the United Kingdom’s bulk data-collection programs violate human-rights law by failing to incorporate adequate privacy safeguards and oversight—but that mass surveillance and intelligence sharing did not violate international law.

Intelligence Oversight

What’s in the House and Senate Intelligence Authorization Bills for Fiscal 2019?

Every summer in recent decades, the House and the Senate intelligence committees articulate their priorities for the intelligence community for the coming fiscal year in the annual Intelligence Authorization Act. As each chamber marks up its version of the bill, outsiders can review the unclassified portion of the draft legislation to discern each body’s priorities before the bill goes to conference.

Intelligence Oversight

In the House Strzok Hearing, a Reminder of Congress’s Shortcomings on Oversight

The House of Representatives hearing Thursday with FBI agent Peter Strzok was far from the chamber’s finest 10 hours. The shortcomings, however, go beyond the House’s role in partisan political fighting over the FBI and its investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 elections. Nor are the shortcomings limited to the splashiest moments of the hearing, such as when Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.) invoked Strzok’s marriage.

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