International Governance

U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman JoAnn S. Makinano / Ben Balter (background)

In Perpetual Peace, Immanuel Kant imagined a world unified under global government that preserved order and kept the peace. Even a cursory glance at the news is proof that Kant’s dream is as far off as ever. Nevertheless, there are already some institutions—the United Nations, international courts, the World Bank—that may yet transform themselves into the forerunners of a more internationalized governanceare system.  And increasingly, there are a number of specific, often technical, areas where international cooperation is so robust that a trajectory toward something akin to international governance is an real possibility. In the coming years, internet governance offers a particularly compelling test case.

Latest in International Governance

Sanctions

The U.S. Names the Iranian Revolutionary Guard a Terrorist Organization and Sanctions the International Criminal Court

On April 8, the Trump administration designated the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) as a foreign terrorist organization (FTO) under Section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. A few days earlier, the administration had made good on its threat to impose sanctions on officials of the International Criminal Court (ICC) involved in the examination of U.S. actions in Afghanistan and Israeli actions in other contexts. As part of this effort, it revoked the U.S. visa of Fatou Bensouda, the ICC’s chief prosecutor.

Cybersecurity

Is International Internet Regulation Just Ahead?

French President Emmanuel Macron got into a fight the other day with President Trump. That public contretempts obscured an equally significant international event—Macron gave the opening remarks at the Internet Governance Forum, whose 2018 meeting convened in Paris this month. He offered what can only be characterized as a strong vision of international internet regulation.

China

China Prepares for an International Order After U.S. Leadership

At China’s Central Foreign Relations Work Conference—an infrequently-held high level strategy session on the nation’s foreign policy—convened on June 23, 2018, Chinese leaders issued an array of foreign policy directives designed to strengthen the activist foreign policy outlined by Xi at the previous foreign affairs work conference held in 2014.

Executive Power

Saving NATO

A recent series of statements by President Donald Trump has resurrected concerns about the United States’ long-standing commitment to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Ahead of the recent NATO summit, Trump wrote to several member states expressing “growing frustration” with their defense spending and warning that the U.S.

International Governance

Can the UK Rescind Its Withdrawal from the EU?

Events in Washington may overshadow what's happening around the world, but nobody can miss the confusion that attends the British government right now. Two ministers have resigned over Brexit, and the furture of Britain’s negotiations with the European Union is radically uncertain. All of which led me to an odd musing—what if Britain changed its mind? Not that it is terribly likely to happen, but what would be the result if the U.K. decided it wanted to stay in the EU?

American Foreign Policy

Foreign Policy After Trump: The U.S. Has Homework to Do

How, exactly, should internationalists prepare to repair the damage of the Trump era? Many of us are rightly preoccupied with trying to limit or prevent damage in the moment, and longer-term challenges may not get the analytic attention they deserve. As Dan Byman wrote recently in Lawfare, repair is hard while destruction is easy. New leaders will need to come in with clear priorities and approaches in mind.

Subscribe to Lawfare

EmailRSSKindle