Politics & National Security

Tony Webster / Ben Balter (background)

One of the great benefits of democracy is that politics impacts policy, even national security policy. Elections, confirmation battles, and legislative fights all affect the way the United States balances its competing priorities, interests and values as it conducts foreign and security affairs. National security professionals would therefore be wise to keep an eye on what candidates are saying about national security matters, how they are faring in the polls, and on which way the winds in Congress seem to be blowing the national security issues of the day.

Latest in Politics & National Security

CFIUS

CFIUS Reform and U.S. Government Concerns over Chinese Investment: A Primer

A summary and analysis of the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act (FIRRMA), Congress’ proposal to reform the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), an interagency group responsible for reviewing foreign investment for potential national security risks.

Politics & National Security

The Public is Not that Fussed About the Surveillance State: Confidence in the Intelligence Community and its Authorities

The public has confidence in the intelligence community. It’s comfortable with the authorities the IC wields and the privacy protections that bind it. And few respondents believe that current authorities should either lapse or be reformed.

Public Opinion

A Deeper Dive into Confidence in the President and the Military on National Security Matters

The public has great confidence in the military—not so much in ongoing military operations. It has little confidence in the President on national security—and even less on specific national security matters.

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